Tram Stop by Subarquitectura

Subarquitectura designed this beautiful tram stop located in the city of Alicante, Spain, turning a traffic circle into a public space.

This stop is the central stage of a new line of the tram that links the centre of the city to residential areas. Through a fractal access system deformed in each side to avoid the existing trees, the traveller can arrive to the platform in 32 different possibilities.

Over the platforms, two empty boxes (36 meter long, 3 meter wide and 2,5 meter high) create a floating void. The holes let light and air pass through, smoothing the shadows and generating a soft breeze in the summer months. At nigh the boxes are transformed into two giant lamps.

Benches are spread over the garden close to the vegetation and the paths, creating a public space.

Via dezeen

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7 thoughts on “Tram Stop by Subarquitectura

  1. Wow it’s nice but I am suprised how this shape still like that if it is cement or any substance please let me know about it beside I am rather interested with your kindergarten design I want to see more designs.

    Best

    sirwan

  2. Yet another example as to why Spain needs to better recognise Landscape Architecture as a profession. Sure, in its own way this is an interesting structure, however, I wouldn’t much like the prospect of waiting under a shelter full of holes during a (heavy) rain event, and how well does / will it actually provide shade and comfort during hotter months? It also seems like it would provide a great insentive for birds to pirch and nest (was this on the project brief?). Finally, how much does this proposal actually add to public space and amenity? I know that I wouldn’t personally want to spend too much time here, but at least I would have a large choice on which path I could leave by….. or maybe I would just walk across the grass as this appears to be the most direct route.

  3. yeah, pretty much agree with Gazza… it is incredible art-wise, i love the idea, lighting and everything, just that — isn’t a train station supposed to be sheltered? — useless in practicality wise.

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